// Garmin Nuvi 1450LMT Best GPS Portable//

If you want to fast safely to your destination, then the GPS is a practical solution for you. With GPS gadget can be found quickly and accurately to an object that you know the place. But with so many brands and models of GPS on the market, how can one determine the best GPS for you? There are two things you need to know in order to determine the best GPS for you: How is work and what you need.

Garmin Nuvi 1450LMT

Garmin Nuvi 1450LMT consists of three parts: the space to regulate the satellite constellation, which controls for monitoring and adjustment of the orbit and transmit data and users as GPS users. In fact, the basic functions of the GPS itself is very simple, which is in a position of the sequence of numbers (X coordinates (longitude), Y (latitude), Z (height)). Each place has its own combination of numbers that is unique, so that when people say a combination of numbers, so if everyone is in this world the place that is the line number, it is always in the same place to end.

Based on how these work, then the main function of GPS is that you look for in a database so that the GPS device you can use the object to determine the real-time search and could appear to show all the events along the road to the desired location. One of the GPS devices that have this feature, the Garmin Nüvi 1450LMT. This GPS includes free lifetime updates, so you buy a GPS that you can use for life, a huge savings right?

What you need
Determine your needs is the second thing you do when buying a GPS device should. If you are looking for duluxe GPS Navigator offers a variety of point-routing, lane assist with junction view to guide you through the dense motorway junctions, the toll-free traffic, pedestrians, and routing options, ecoRoute The path to find the most economical, the Garmin Nuvi 1450LMT much on your needs. Features in the Garmin Nuvi 1450LMT includes:

• Large 5-inch screen
• The advanced navigation features, including voice prompts, turn-by-turn directions
• multiple-point routing, lane assist with junction view, pedestrian routing options
• ecoRoute
• Includes lifetime membership card nüMaps
• free lifetime traffic updates
• Points of Interest (POI)
• Tools
• Battery

anthagio:

Themocrity is my first dark theme. I’ve stuck with  the light colors since the beginning, so I figured it was time to change  it up a bit. This theme, like my last two, utilizes jQuery Masonry by David  Desandro.
After receiving over 10,000 installs, I’ve decided to completely revamp Themocrity and include a ton of new features.

Link Color Allows you to change the color of the links located inside of the posts.
Post Icon Hover Color Allows you to change the background color of the icons when you hover over them.
Twitter Link Color If you’ve enabled Twitter access through the Services tab, this will allow you to change the color of the links that show up in the Twitter box on your blog.
Pagination Color Allows you to change the background color of the “Next Page” and “Previous Page” pagination links when hovered on them.
Post Title Link Color Allows you to change the color of the linked title headers such as the one you see when posting a link.
Note Links Color Allows you to change the color of the links in the notes section.
Footer Link Color Allows you to change the color of the links located in the footer.
Header Link Hover Color Allows you to change the color of the header links when hovered on them.
Streampad Background Color If you’ve enabled the Streampad music player widget, you can change the background color of said widget here.
Vimeo Video Player Color This will change the color of the Vimeo player controls.
Youtube Video Player Color This will change the background color of the Youtube video controls.
Background Image You can upload a custom background image here.
Centered Layout Tick this option if you want your blog’s layout to be centered.
Three Column Layout Tick this option if you want to use the three-column version of this theme.
Enable Streampad If you want to entertain your visitors with some music, you can enable the Streampad widget which will allow your visitors to play all of your audio posts.
Show Archive, Random, and Feed Link This option allows you to either hide or show these links.
Custom Links If you need to display extras links such as your Facebook, Twitter, Myspace, etc., you can do that here.
Custom Link URL Place the actual URL to your custom link here. Example: http://facebook.com.
Custom Link Title Place the name of the link you want to display. Example: Facebook.
Google Analytics ID If you have a Google Analytics account, place your ID here. Google Analytics, in essence, tracks all of your blog’s visitors and displays the information to you. If you don’t have a Google Analytics account, you can sign up for one here.
Disqus Shortname If you want to enable the Disqus commenting widget, place your shortname here. If you don’t have a Disqus shortname, sign up on their website to receive one.
To use this theme, click on the photo and you will be taken to the install page.
If you have any questions, concerns, and/or suggestions, feel free to drop them in my ask box.
Theme Updates and Fixes August 14, 2010: Submitted an update that completely revamped the entire theme. I took out unneeded code, changed around the way the theme looked in general, and added more custom options to allow users to further customize the theme.

anthagio:

Themocrity is my first dark theme. I’ve stuck with the light colors since the beginning, so I figured it was time to change it up a bit. This theme, like my last two, utilizes jQuery Masonry by David Desandro.

After receiving over 10,000 installs, I’ve decided to completely revamp Themocrity and include a ton of new features.

Link Color
Allows you to change the color of the links located inside of the posts.

Post Icon Hover Color
Allows you to change the background color of the icons when you hover over them.

Twitter Link Color
If you’ve enabled Twitter access through the Services tab, this will allow you to change the color of the links that show up in the Twitter box on your blog.

Pagination Color
Allows you to change the background color of the “Next Page” and “Previous Page” pagination links when hovered on them.

Post Title Link Color
Allows you to change the color of the linked title headers such as the one you see when posting a link.

Note Links Color
Allows you to change the color of the links in the notes section.

Footer Link Color
Allows you to change the color of the links located in the footer.

Header Link Hover Color
Allows you to change the color of the header links when hovered on them.

Streampad Background Color
If you’ve enabled the Streampad music player widget, you can change the background color of said widget here.

Vimeo Video Player Color
This will change the color of the Vimeo player controls.

Youtube Video Player Color
This will change the background color of the Youtube video controls.

Background Image
You can upload a custom background image here.

Centered Layout
Tick this option if you want your blog’s layout to be centered.

Three Column Layout
Tick this option if you want to use the three-column version of this theme.

Enable Streampad
If you want to entertain your visitors with some music, you can enable the Streampad widget which will allow your visitors to play all of your audio posts.

Show Archive, Random, and Feed Link
This option allows you to either hide or show these links.

Custom Links
If you need to display extras links such as your Facebook, Twitter, Myspace, etc., you can do that here.

Custom Link URL
Place the actual URL to your custom link here. Example: http://facebook.com.

Custom Link Title
Place the name of the link you want to display. Example: Facebook.

Google Analytics ID
If you have a Google Analytics account, place your ID here. Google Analytics, in essence, tracks all of your blog’s visitors and displays the information to you. If you don’t have a Google Analytics account, you can sign up for one here.

Disqus Shortname
If you want to enable the Disqus commenting widget, place your shortname here. If you don’t have a Disqus shortname, sign up on their website to receive one.

To use this theme, click on the photo and you will be taken to the install page.

If you have any questions, concerns, and/or suggestions, feel free to drop them in my ask box.

Theme Updates and Fixes August 14, 2010: Submitted an update that completely revamped the entire theme. I took out unneeded code, changed around the way the theme looked in general, and added more custom options to allow users to further customize the theme.

beingblog:

The Fall of the Wall, JFK’s Assassination, and Two Birthdays Krista Tippett, host
I was born on the night John F. Kennedy was elected president: November 9, 1960. To be more precise, the election itself was on November 8, but I was born in the wee hours of the night, in a long ago age before computerized returns, as his slim victory became apparent. My father paced the halls of the hospital with a transistor radio at his ear. He was a member of our local Oklahoma chapter of Young Democrats. He told me that I was the handsome president’s personal good luck charm. And so the Camelot president’s assassination is the earliest memory I recall — too early, some say, for me to really remember it, but I know I do. I can still feel the panic of the adults around me and the terrible sense that somehow I had failed.

Two decades later, I ended up spending most of the 1980s, most of my 20s, in a city that kept Kennedy’s memory alive like no other. He remained the unparalleled icon of the charismatic America that had rushed to Berlin’s side as the barbed wire beginnings of the Wall closed around it on August 13, 1961. I wrote an op-ed piece for The New York Times when the Berlin Wall hit the quarter-century mark in 1986. By that time, it was 12-feet high — and two walls actually, with a no man’s land in between, scattered with tank traps, its every inch monitored by men with binoculars and guns. It wouldn’t be right to say that the Wall had gained acceptance in either of the German worlds it sliced apart. But it had become part of the fabric of reality, of life and imagination. And what really kept it standing was a rock-solid, ingrown fear — a faith, if you will — that the mighty Soviet Union would send in its tanks if those men with guns ever fell down on the job.
Gorbachev inspired a completely different kind of faith, one which evaporated that fear and revealed the Wall for what it was — slabs of concrete and asbestos manned by border guards, who were human beings, after all, and could not possibly resist the peaceful crush of the entire city of East Berlin moving towards them, unafraid, on the night of November 9, 1989. And so it was on my 29th birthday that I learned, stepping off an airplane in Oklahoma, that the wall had opened up.

The suddenness of the Wall’s fall utterly defied the imagination of everyone living closest to it. Even with Gorbachev, and the political changes that rolled across Eastern Europe in the mid-80s, no one really believed it could open up from one day to the next. I recently learned that one of my great friends and colleagues from those years, John Tagliabue of The New York Times, spent the evening of November 9 watching television in a hotel room in Warsaw with the West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl, who was as stupefied by the turn of events as anyone else. I could never have imagined that I would one day walk across a bridge that had separated me by less than a mile from an East German family I loved, but had been an impassable border zone throughout our friendship.

Or that I would stroll through the inner wall and the outer wall minus the tank traps, as people chiseled and hammered out pieces to sell or to save for posterity. Nor could I have anticipated the magical reunion I would have with some East German artist friends in Austria for the Christmas of 1989. I would be there as they and their children saw mountains for the first time.

I hold these memories as a reminder that there is at any given moment much we don’t see, and more change possible than we can begin to imagine. I recently had a lovely conversation, that will air on our show in early December, with Bill McKibben. He and I are exact contemporaries; we were both born in 1960 and in college for the same four years. In 1989, he was publishing The End of Nature — the first book about the then-obscure subject of climate change. As I learned from him, though, the science of climate change had begun to emerge at the height of the Cold War. Already in 1957, two scientists at the Scripps Institution described their findings that humanity had initiated an unprecedented “geophysical experiment” that it might not survive. And if humanity is around to write history in a century or two, what was happening with the climate in 1960 and 1989 may dwarf what we perceived as the great dramas we were living through.
I draw caution as well as hope from the fact that history tends to surprise us. And I think I’ve had enough historically momentous birthdays for one lifetime.

beingblog:

The Fall of the Wall, JFK’s Assassination, and Two Birthdays
Krista Tippett, host

I was born on the night John F. Kennedy was elected president: November 9, 1960. To be more precise, the election itself was on November 8, but I was born in the wee hours of the night, in a long ago age before computerized returns, as his slim victory became apparent. My father paced the halls of the hospital with a transistor radio at his ear. He was a member of our local Oklahoma chapter of Young Democrats. He told me that I was the handsome president’s personal good luck charm. And so the Camelot president’s assassination is the earliest memory I recall — too early, some say, for me to really remember it, but I know I do. I can still feel the panic of the adults around me and the terrible sense that somehow I had failed.

Two decades later, I ended up spending most of the 1980s, most of my 20s, in a city that kept Kennedy’s memory alive like no other. He remained the unparalleled icon of the charismatic America that had rushed to Berlin’s side as the barbed wire beginnings of the Wall closed around it on August 13, 1961. I wrote an op-ed piece for The New York Times when the Berlin Wall hit the quarter-century mark in 1986. By that time, it was 12-feet high — and two walls actually, with a no man’s land in between, scattered with tank traps, its every inch monitored by men with binoculars and guns. It wouldn’t be right to say that the Wall had gained acceptance in either of the German worlds it sliced apart. But it had become part of the fabric of reality, of life and imagination. And what really kept it standing was a rock-solid, ingrown fear — a faith, if you will — that the mighty Soviet Union would send in its tanks if those men with guns ever fell down on the job.

Gorbachev inspired a completely different kind of faith, one which evaporated that fear and revealed the Wall for what it was — slabs of concrete and asbestos manned by border guards, who were human beings, after all, and could not possibly resist the peaceful crush of the entire city of East Berlin moving towards them, unafraid, on the night of November 9, 1989. And so it was on my 29th birthday that I learned, stepping off an airplane in Oklahoma, that the wall had opened up.

bridge-friends

The suddenness of the Wall’s fall utterly defied the imagination of everyone living closest to it. Even with Gorbachev, and the political changes that rolled across Eastern Europe in the mid-80s, no one really believed it could open up from one day to the next. I recently learned that one of my great friends and colleagues from those years, John Tagliabue of The New York Times, spent the evening of November 9 watching television in a hotel room in Warsaw with the West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl, who was as stupefied by the turn of events as anyone else. I could never have imagined that I would one day walk across a bridge that had separated me by less than a mile from an East German family I loved, but had been an impassable border zone throughout our friendship.

Or that I would stroll through the inner wall and the outer wall minus the tank traps, as people chiseled and hammered out pieces to sell or to save for posterity. Nor could I have anticipated the magical reunion I would have with some East German artist friends in Austria for the Christmas of 1989. I would be there as they and their children saw mountains for the first time.

I hold these memories as a reminder that there is at any given moment much we don’t see, and more change possible than we can begin to imagine. I recently had a lovely conversation, that will air on our show in early December, with Bill McKibben. He and I are exact contemporaries; we were both born in 1960 and in college for the same four years. In 1989, he was publishing The End of Nature — the first book about the then-obscure subject of climate change. As I learned from him, though, the science of climate change had begun to emerge at the height of the Cold War. Already in 1957, two scientists at the Scripps Institution described their findings that humanity had initiated an unprecedented “geophysical experiment” that it might not survive. And if humanity is around to write history in a century or two, what was happening with the climate in 1960 and 1989 may dwarf what we perceived as the great dramas we were living through.

I draw caution as well as hope from the fact that history tends to surprise us. And I think I’ve had enough historically momentous birthdays for one lifetime.

Gowalla: A New Gowalla

gowalla:

Nearly three years ago I sat on a beach at Lake Tahoe and watched as a large low-flying cloud hung above the lake, creating the backdrop for a beautiful weekend of solitude. As much as I enjoyed the time alone to clear my thoughts, I was overwhelmed with the desire to share this experience with…

IFTTT Blog: ifttt the beginning...

ifttt:

I’d like to humbly announce that the first beta invites for a project I’m incredibly excited about are out the door. The project is called ifttt, shorthand for “if this then that”. With this blog I hope to begin fleshing out some of the initial inspirations that led to the inception of ifttt…

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